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ROLE OF MUSCLES: MUSCLE FITNESS
Those who exercise and are physically fit often have bulky muscles but they are generally fairly agile. Unfit and tired people have extremely sluggish bodies and have greater inertia than normal people. Boxers, sprinters, gymnasts, dancers and the like are so agile and quick in their movements because their muscle tone is perfectly balanced. Ballerinas with a well-balanced weight and muscle tone are free in their movements. They are 'as light as a feather' and they can be lifted and moved with ease and grace. Martial arts practitioners, having concentrated on building muscle tone, can perform their swift and almost acrobatic movements with perfection and ease.
So it is the fitness of the muscles that displays our well-being. Nobody has ever 'scientifically' studied or proved the extent to which muscles support our body weight and whether it is they that carry the weight of the body and not the spine. The conclusions that I have drawn are based on logic. Although scientific proof, based on mathematical, physical or chemical analysis, can be very accurate in some matters, it is inadequate in solving the mysteries of Nature, of which the human body is only a part, and helpless when it comes to studying Nature's laws and phenomena. Ancient scientists and philosophers used logic to prove their point. They were often backed up by human experience or simple experiment. Modern science considers these methods too primitive or 'subjective' for any validation and tends to reject them outright. They want 'evidence-based medicine'. So to analyse our spine design we need logic, not science. In the following chapters, as you have probably guessed, I will show that logic leads us to the conclusion that it is the muscles closely cladding the spine that keeps it erect, muscles that are unfortunately so inaccessible that only special exercises and massage can keep them fit. The exercises recommended by books and gymnasia tend to tone up the greater superficial muscles, important in bending and lifting, but are only of secondary significance in posture and disc protection. Thus science has misled us and fitness instruction tends to be misguided.
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